Services

Board of Supervisors to Support Ground Reliability Improvement Program

homepage

The Board of Supervisors will send a five-signature letter in support of the Groundwater Reliability Improvement Program (GRIP) to Los Angeles County Congressional Delegation as well as to the Honorable Grace Napolitano and Robb Whitaker, General Manager of the Water Replenishment District of Southern California, Supervisor Don Knabe announced today.

For years, Los Angeles County has depended on imported river water from Northern California and from the Colorado River to replenish the groundwater. Imported replenishment water is not available for the foreseeable future and is not a reliable source due to long-term drought, increased demands, environmental restrictions and climate change. It is also costly and energy inefficient.

GRIP is critical because it will ensure that Los Angeles County continues to be able to sustainably draw upon groundwater supplies for drinking water.

“GRIP benefits all of us, as well as businesses, educational institutions and government offices,” said Supervisor Knabe. “This truly needs to be supported to authorize Federal assistance for the project in order to make this economically viable and to help relieve demand on imported river water.”

Metro to hold community meetings on the South Bay Metro Green Line Extension Project

Metro will hold four community meetings beginning Wednesday, October 20, to update the public on the South Bay Metro Green Line Extension project. The purpose of these meetings is to seek public comments and input as the environmental process continues for extending rail service farther into the South Bay to improve mobility in southwest Los Angeles County.

Metro is currently preparing a Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (DEIS/DEIR) to identify transit improvements that would provide an alternative to the I-405 corridor by accessing the regional rail network through connections to the proposed Crenshaw/LAX Transit Corridor, currently under environmental review.

As part of the Draft EIS/EIR, Metro will assess existing conditions in the study area, further refine the project alternatives, assess their potential impacts and identify possible and reasonable mitigation measures.

Two ‘build’ alternatives are being considered in the DEIS/DEIR. The Light Rail Alterative will evaluate extending the Metro Green Line from its current terminus at the Redondo Beach Station to the proposed Torrance Regional Transit Center (RTC).

The freight track alternative will evaluate operating self propelled rail transit vehicles on the Harbor Subdivision right-of-way using upgraded rail tracks from the El Segundo/LAX area to the proposed Torrance RTC. In addition the Draft EIS/EIR will evaluate the No Build and Transportation Systems Management alternatives.

The public is encouraged to attend the community meetings and provide their input. Discussed at the meetings will be a project overview and update, a recap of the Scoping Meetings that took place earlier this year and a progress report on the project alternatives and proposed station locations.

The following is a list of upcoming meetings:

Wednesday, October 20, 2010 (6-8 p.m.) Nakano Theater, 3330 Civic Center Drive, Torrance.

Thursday, October 21, 2010 (6-8 p.m.) Lawndale Christian Church, 4234 W. 147th Street, Lawndale.

Monday, October 25, 2010 (6-8 p.m.) North Redondo Senior Center, Perry Park, 2308 Rockefeller Lane, Redondo Beach.

Tuesday, October 26, 2010 (6-8 p.m.) Flight Path Learning Center, 6661 West Imperial Highway, Los Angeles.

Click Here for more information about the South Bay Metro Green Line Extension Project

Residents Warned to Stay Out of Flood Control Channels

Supervisor Knabe joined County officials this week to advise residents to stay out of County flood control channels, rivers and debris basins during storm season. While the County’s vast network of bike trials remain open n to the public on dry days, residents should never enter flood control channels when it rains.

“The message is simple: when it rains, stay out of the water ways,” said Supervisor Knabe. “Do not tempt mother nature by entering these water ways during a storm. You will not win. That’s a guarantee.”

At peak flow, the  Los Angeles River moves close to 183,000 cubic feet of storm water per second out to the ocean equaling the pressure of 40 million garden hoses running at full blast.

Click here to watch a Storm Weather Preparedness video and learn more about the dangers of flood control channels during storms.

County to Improve South Whittier Roadways

The Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a project to resurface roadway pavement on Arroyo Drive, Dunton Drive and connected streets, in the unincorporated community of South Whittier, Supervisor Don Knabe announced today. The project is part of Los Angeles County’s continued efforts to improve infrastructure in the unincorporated areas.

“It is important that we look into ways to improve road quality and motorist safety throughout the County,” said Supervisor Knabe. “By making these improvements to Arroyo Drive and Dunton Drive, not only will the residents of South Whittier benefit, but so will the residents of neighboring cities and our other unincorporated communities who drive these routes every day.”

The total cost of the project is $1,279,853.36 and will be financed with State Proposition 1B funds and is included in the Fourth Supervisorial District’s Road Fund Budget. Construction is expected to begin this fall and will take approximately three months to complete.

Click here for a complete list of streets that will be affected by this project.

County to Improve Rowland Heights Roadways

The Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a project to reconstruct and resurface Pathfinder Road and Alexdale Lane in the unincorporated community of Rowland Heights, Supervisor Don Knabe announced today. The project is part of Los Angeles County’s continued efforts to improve infrastructure in the unincorporated areas.

“It is important that we look into ways to improve road quality and motorist safety throughout the County,” said Supervisor Knabe. “By making these improvements to Pathfinder Road and Alexdale Lane, not only will the residents of Rowland Heights benefit, but so will the residents of neighboring cities and our other unincorporated communities who drive these routes every day.”

The project will reconstruct and repave Pathfinder Road-Alexdale Lane to 300 feet west of the Brea Canyon cutoff in Rowland Heights. Additionally, the project includes reconstruction of adjacent curbs, gutters, curb ramps and sidewalks. The project is funded by the Fourth Supervisorial District’s Road Fund Budget. Construction is expected to begin in March 2011 and be completed by July 2011.

Phase 2 of San Gabriel River Bike Path Realignment Moves Forward

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a motion to award a construction contract for Phase 2 of the San Gabriel River Bicycle Trail Realignment, Supervisor Don Knabe announced today.

Phase 2 of the project will realign and reconstruct 460 feet of the bike path just south of Del Amo Boulevard. Additionally, the existing reclamation waterline and street lights will be relocated and trail signage, yellow centerline striping, and pavement markings will be installed.

“It is important ensure the safety of everyone who utilizes the bike paths along our riverbeds,” said Supervisor Knabe. “These improvements will continue to enhance safety and increase the enjoyment of the residents and visitors who use the San Gabriel River Bike Trail.”

This project is part of a larger capital investment plan that Supervisor Knabe announced during his annual State of the County address on November 4, 2009.  At the event, Supervisor Knabe unveiled over $42 million in Fourth District Capital Projects that would be built in communities across the Fourth District in 2010.

Los Angeles County Seeks Repairs To Orange County Runway

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has joined a regional effort to secure $17 million in Federal funding to repair the cracked and deteriorated runway surface at the Joint Forces Training Base in Los Alamitos, the main entry point for rescue workers and disaster supplies that will come into LA County after a major disaster.

Although the base is located in Orange County, the runway at Los Alamitos is the only military facility between Ventura County and San Diego County that is able to accommodate large transport aircraft – the type needed for personnel and supply delivery after a disaster. The runway surface is cracked and deteriorated to a point where there are loose chunks which can be sucked into a jet engine and cause the engine to explode after ingestion. This condition recently caused Air Force One to land at Long Beach Airport instead of the more secure facility at Los Alamitos and will prevent planes full of disaster supplies from landing there unless it is repaired.

Under today’s action, Supervisor Don Knabe asked his colleagues to formally support the request for $17 million to repair the runway and give the Southern California region a fully functioning airfield during a disaster.